Lomatium orientale (Northern Idaho Biscuitroot)

Plant Info
Also known as: Oriental Desert Parsley, Salt-and-Pepper
Genus:Lomatium
Family:Apiaceae (Carrot)
Life cycle:perennial
Origin:native
Habitat:sun; open, dry prairie and rock outcrops
Bloom season:April - May
Plant height:4 to 8 inches
Wetland Indicator Status:none
MN county distribution (click map to enlarge):Minnesota county distribution map
National distribution (click map to enlarge):National distribution map

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Detailed Information

Flower: Flower shape: 5-petals Cluster type: flat

[photo of flowers] Flat to rounded compound clusters (umbels) up to 1½ inches across on a stalk up to 5 inches long that arises from a leaf axil. Flowers are less than 1/8-inch across with 5 white or pinkish petals that are tightly curled in to the center. 5 long stamens tipped with white to deep pink anthers protrude from the center. An umbel is made up of 12 to 16 (or more) smaller clusters (umbellets), each densely packed with up to 30 flowers. One plant can have many (+15) clusters.

Leaves and stems: Leaf attachment: alternate Leaf attachment: basal Leaf type: compound

[photo of leaves] Leaves are mostly basal, sometimes alternate on a short stem. Leaves are broadly triangular to lanced shaped in outline, up to 4 inches long by 3 inches wide, 3 times compound into feathery segments creating a lacy, fern-like appearance. The base of the leaf stalk sheathes the stem. Surfaces have fine, soft hairs giving the foliage a silvery green color. Stems are short, branch out from the base, spreading to erect and, along with the flower stalk, covered in fine soft hairs and commonly tinged reddish.

Notes:

While not a listed species in Minnesota, Biscuitroot is by no means common as it is found only on dry western prairie habitats. These have diminished greatly in both quantity and quality due to agriculture and fire suppression respectively. Where this species is found, it is often missed due to its very early flowering period, after which it quickly sets seed and goes dormant for the season, well before most hikers and plant explorers are out and about in the field.

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More photos

Photos by K. Chayka taken at Morton Outcrop SNA, Renville County. Photos courtesy Peter M. Dziuk taken at Morton Outcrop SNA and at Yellow Bank Hills SNA, Lac Qui Parle County.

Comments

Have you seen this plant in Minnesota, or have any other comments about it?

Posted by: Brian - St. Peter
on: 2014-04-27 21:15:22

This plant is now in bloom at Morton Outcrops SNA.

Posted by: Brian - St. Peter
on: 2015-03-16 21:26:19

I was at Morton Outcrops SNA yesterday (March 15), and some of the plants were beginning to sprout. Two of them had inflorescences with partly opened flowers, still very low to the ground.

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